Micro-loans, Insecticide-Treated Bednets and Malaria Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Orissa (India)

Micro-loans, Insecticide-Treated Bednets and Malaria Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Orissa (India)
March 2011-Alessandro Tarozzi, Aprajit Mahajan, Brian Blackbur, Dan Kopf, Lakshmi Krishnan, Joanne Yoong
Lead Center : Centre for Microfinance
Focus Area :Credit

Many severe health risks in developing countries could be substantially reduced with access to appropriate preventive measures. However, the associated costs are often high enough to restrict access among poor households, and free provision through public health campaigns is often not financially feasible. We describe findings from the first large-scale cluster randomized controlled trial in a developing country context that evaluates the uptake of a health-protecting technology, insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs), through micro-consumer loans, as compared to free distribution and control conditions. Numerous studies have shown that widespread, regular use of ITNs is one the most effective preventive measures against malaria. However, ownership rates remain very low in most malarious areas, including our study areas in rural Orissa (India).


Related Projects : Microloans, Bednets and Malaria: Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial in Orissa

Many severe health risks in developing countries could be substantially reduced with access to appropriate preventive measures. However, the associated costs are often high enough to restrict access among poor households, and free provision through public health campaigns is often not financially feasible. We describe findings from the first large-scale cluster randomized controlled trial in a developing country context that evaluates the uptake of a health-protecting technology, insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs), through micro-consumer loans, as compared to free distribution and control conditions. Numerous studies have shown that widespread, regular use of ITNs is one the most effective preventive measures against malaria. However, ownership rates remain very low in most malarious areas, including our study areas in rural Orissa (India).